POPPED! IN DOWNTOWN KENT
LUCAS MISERA / WKSU

Facing Headwinds in the Loan Market, Entrepreneurs Look Elsewhere for Funding

Launching a new business has never been easy, but it's even tougher for startups in the post-recession economy. Credit remains tight, and banks in Northeast Ohio rarely risk loans to unproven entrepreneurs. In this week's Exploradio, WKSU's Lucas Misera looks at how small-business owners are getting creative in startup financing. Show Me the Money
Studies show that business loans have taken a backseat to financing methods like bonds and commercial paper since the early 1990s. The...

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CENTER FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT / CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY

A new report highlights how immigrants are spurring economic growth in Ohio, and invigorating communities across the state.

The report, which was produced by the Center for Community Planning and Development at Cleveland State University, notes that immigrants in Ohio are some of the nation’s most educated.

A photo of the ECOT Headquarters in Columbus
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Though it’s been closed for months, critics are now accusing what was the state’s largest online charter school of deliberately manipulating student data to defraud the state out of millions of dollars. The allegation against the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is coming from a former employee. That allegation is part of a larger investigation. 

A photo of workers' comp headquarters in Columbus
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Employers could be getting a big rebate if the Board of Directors for the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation approves it.

Workers' Comp Administrator Sarah Morrison says the agency’s investment strategy is paying off. So she will ask the board to give $1.5 billion in premium rebates to employers this summer.

A photo of a traffic camera
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled that cities have the right to operate traffic cameras. Now the court is deciding whether a lower court can block a plan to cut state funding to certain communities who use those cameras.

The case involves about a dozen cities and villages.

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DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A new report suggests improving access to food might cut Medicaid costs in Ohio.

A study from The Center of Community Solutions found that tying food access with healthcare programs could help fight food insecurity.  

Loren Anthes  is the author of the report and says there are many options for reducing food insecurity in Ohio.

photo of Bill Lager
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Former U.S. attorney Steve Dettelbach, who’s running for Ohio attorney general, is accusing his likely Republican opponent of mishandling a whistleblower’s complaint about the state’s largest online charter school.

In a call with reporters, Dettelbach implied Auditor Dave Yost is a bookkeeper who doesn’t understand or appreciate what a delay in turning evidence of fraud over to prosecutors can mean.

Photo of Racer Sami Fagan
WIKIMEDIA

The Akron Racers could be coming back to Akron in the near future.

Former General Manager Joey Arrietta is talking to investors in an effort to form a new women’s pro softball team next year.

She still owns the name of the team and says she really wants to put a team on the field.

"I have retained the name and the rights to logos and the opportunity to put a team back on the field at Firestone Stadium and preserve the history of our organization going forward as early as 2019."

PRESS 53

One of the most beloved members of the Northeast Ohio poetry community has died. 

Kent State University poetry professor Maj Ragain died last week at the age of 77.

Ragain often wrote of growing up in rural Illinois and his arrival in Kent in as a student in 1969, shortly before the May 4th shootings.  He began teaching at Kent in 1981, and for the past 30 years organized the Jawbone Poetry Festival on May 4th weekend.

photo of Kent State
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, April 24:

WIKIMEDIA

The difference between an animal assistant and a pet is an increasing concern for landlords in Ohio and the rest of the country. It was a big part of the discussion of fair-housing law at a conference of hundreds of landlords in Akron this past weekend.

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From NPR

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has ordered the expulsion of a 71-year-old Australian nun, giving her 30 days to leave the country after she reportedly joined protest rallies against his government.

Sister Patricia Fox, who has lived in the Philippines for nearly three decades, has had her missionary visa revoked after apparently speaking out against Duterte at demonstrations in southern Davao City.

She has been labeled an "undesirable" foreigner for what the country's Bureau of Immigration says is "her involvement in partisan political activities."

A federal judge has ruled against the Trump administration's decision to end deportation protections for some young immigrants, saying the White House was "arbitrary and capricious" in moving to end the Obama-era DACA program.

In a blow to President Trump, who has long railed against the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, U.S. District Judge John D. Bates for the District of Columbia said the Department of Homeland Security had failed to provide an adequate rationale for why the program is unlawful.

Over the course of 15 years, the U.S. has contributed more than $3 billion into a trust fund that is aimed at helping Afghanistan with its reconstruction.

In total, donors from around the world have given the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund, which is administered by the World Bank, more than $10 billion.

But according to a watchdog appointed by Congress, those billions of dollars are at risk because the World Bank and the government of Afghanistan are not adequately monitoring where they go and how they are used.

There's arguably nothing grander in the nation's capital than a state dinner.

The red carpet gets rolled out, the silverware is shined, and the coveted guest list is winnowed down.

At the New York City cell phone shop where he does his homework, nine-year-old Ahmed Alhuthaifi says he misses his mom a lot.

"Sometimes, I feel like I am going to cry," he says. "Trump won't let her in."

After a years-long effort, his mother, who is stuck in Saudi Arabia, was denied a visa due to President Trump's restrictions on immigration and travel from certain countries, including Yemen. She and Ahmed's four younger siblings, who live with her, missed Ahmed's birthday celebrations on April 3.

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