Ted Sikora has watched his Apama series expand to include the antihero the Tap Dance Killer.
Mark Arehart / WKSU

State of the Arts: Local Comic Book Series Brings Cleveland to Life

Northeast Ohio has a rich comic book history. Superman was conceived in Cleveland in the 1930s. In the 70s, it was Black Lightning. But both stories are not set here. It was just a few years ago that Northeast Ohio got its own locally based superhero. On this week’s State of the Arts, we delve into the world of Hero Tomorrow Comics.

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Planned Parenthood advocates holding signs
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News

Abortion rights advocates in Ohio are worried about the effect of what they call a “gag rule” that would ban family planning clinics that get federal funds from referring women for abortions or from sharing space with abortion providers.

The rule concerns facilities that receive Title X funds, which pay for wellness exams, cancer screenings, HIV tests and birth control.  Right to life groups are celebrating, saying abortion is not family planning.

photo of Steve Wagner
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The federal government has rejected Ohio’s attempt to end the individual mandate for health care. The mandate is a mainstay of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Health care advocates say lawmakers should take this as a sign to work with Obamacare instead of against it.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says the state did not prove in its waiver request that enough Ohioans would still have access to affordable care if it were to end the individual mandate.

Photo of bobcat
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Animal advocates are applauding the state’s decision to postpone a proposed trapping season for bobcats. The state Wildlife Council voted 6-1 Thursday to put the proposal on an indefinite hold.

Corey Roscoe with the U.S. Humane Society applauds the decision. She says the science does not back up harvesting bobcats.

photo of Russ Balthis
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The City of Cuyahoga Falls is seeking more than $16 million in lost revenue and damages over what it says was a botched plan to install water and electric meters throughout the city.

photo of help wanted sign
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s unemployment rate has dropped again, to a level not seen in 16 years.

The state’s jobless rate for April dropped to 4.3 percent, which is the lowest level since July 2001, when it was a tenth of a point lower. That edges the state closer to the national employment rate of 3.9 percent.

Northeast Ohio economist George Zeller says the latest numbers show more job growth in Ohio in the first four months of this year than in all of 2017, which was the weakest job growth year since the Great Recession.

photo of Hiram College entrance
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, May 18:

Ted Sikora has watched his Apama series expand to include the antihero the Tap Dance Killer.
Mark Arehart / WKSU

Northeast Ohio has a rich comic book history. Superman was conceived in Cleveland in the 1930s. In the 70s, it was Black Lightning. But both stories are not set here.

It was just a few years ago that Northeast Ohio got its own locally based superhero. On this week’s State of the Arts, we delve into the world of Hero Tomorrow Comics.

Union Metal streetlights
UNION METAL

Canton’s Union Metal will reopen with a new owner after its acquisition by a New York-based investment firm. 

In December, the parent company announced it would shut down operations, leading to the layoffs of more than 300 workers.

photo of marijuana
United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Backers of a state constitutional amendment that would allow voters to decide to legalize and regulate marijuana like alcohol will soon start collecting signatures to put it before voters. 

The Ohio Ballot Board has unanimously approved the language proposed by backers of the marijuana legalization plan as a single issue.

photo of Dan Ramos
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Studies show in the near future, about two-thirds of Ohio’s jobs will require some college or skilled vocational training. But the cost of getting that education often leaves Ohioans with thousands of dollars in student loans that hinder their buying power and ability to succeed financially.

Democratic Rep. Dan Ramos says he pays a couple of hundred dollars each month on student loans. The 36-year-old lawmaker says he’s not alone.

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From NPR

A Chinese archaeologist who identified a long-lost clay army consisting of 8,000 soldiers died Wednesday, according to China's state media.

Zhao Kangmin first laid eyes on fragments of terra cotta warriors in 1974. Farmers some 20 miles from China's central city of Xi'an were digging a well and struck into the pieces.

In a message, which took to church not only those in attendance at the royal wedding of Britain's Prince Harry, 33, and American actress Meghan Markle, 36, on Saturday — but millions watching from across the world — Bishop Michael Bruce Curry preached on the "redemptive power of love."

Curry, the first African-American presiding bishop of the American Episcopal Church encouraged all receiving his message to discover the power of love to make of "this old world a new world."

Roger Stone, a longtime adviser of President Trump, complained of partisan behavior by special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation on Sunday, but also speculated that he could be under investigation by Mueller for a crime unrelated to coordinating with Russia leading up to the 2016 presidential election.

"It is not inconceivable now that Mr. Mueller and his team may seek to conjure up some extraneous crime, pertaining to my business, or maybe not even pertaining to the 2016 election," Stone said, in an appearance on NBC's Meet The Press.

It has been a week of dramatic developments in striking juxtaposition for Israel and Gaza. On Monday, several hundred people gathered in Jerusalem for the opening ceremony of the U.S. Embassy. Simultaneously, about 60 miles away, Gaza suffered its deadliest day in years as Israeli soldiers opened fire on Palestinian protesters.

But have these developments really changed anything in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Demands have stayed the same, impasses between the different sides have been highlighted and the United States' role in future peace talks appears to be shifting.

Democrats may hold 49 votes in the Senate but for all practical purposes, they have been completely disarmed when it comes to opposing President Trump's judicial nominees.

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