photo of Matt Hectorne
DAVE KOEN

Shuffle: Matt Hectorne Explores the Struggles of the Touring Musician

Singer-songwriter Matt Hectorne was raised in the South but now calls Northeast Ohio home. His latest album, “Work,” explores the challenges of living as a married musician often on the road. The album’s direct, one-word title refers to Hectorne’s own efforts to build a career and improve himself. Hectorne was born in Memphis and raised in Mississippi, but he grew weary of small-town life and eventually ended up in the Cleveland area. “There wasn’t too much modern stuff going on,” Hectorne...

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cover for the first edition of "Official B.A.B.E. Magazine."
OFFICIAL B.A.B.E. MAGAZINE / OFFICIAL B.A.B.E. MAGAZINE

A local entrepreneur is doing her part to help other African-American business owners find success.

Da’Shika Wells is the founder of Akron-based VineWorks Marketing. Last month, Wells launched an online publication to guide entrepreneurs through some of the obstacles she’s experienced.

Wells says the "Official Black and Brilliant Entrepreneur Magazine,” or “B.A.B.E. Magazine,” offers advice to black business owners, one of the fastest growing sets of entrepreneurs.

A photo of a Cleveland fire truck
CITY OF CLEVELAND PHOTOGRAPHIC BUREAU / CITY OF CLEVELAND PHOTOGRAPHIC BUREAU

A former battalion chief for Cleveland’s Fire Division is suing the city, claiming it violated his  First Amendment rights.

A photo of Sen. Bill Coley, Republican, Sponsor of the legislation.
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio lawmakers are now weighing in with a proposed fix for problems with the process being used by the state Commerce Department in the medical marijuana program. 

Republican Sen. Bill Coley says his legislation gives Ohio’s auditor 30 days to do a full performance audit of growers’ license applications, then gives the department another month to correct problems.

“By doing this, we can remove any clouds of suspicion or impropriety or any suggestions or innuendo of impropriety.”

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

David Jennings, the longtime director of the Akron-Summit County Public Library, is officially retiring next week.

In his nearly four decades with the library, Jennings has played a pivotal role in the creation of the downtown library and the system’s 18 satellite branches. During that time he’s overseen the transition from card catalogues to digital downloads, and new roles in the community, such as providing a maker space.

I caught up recently with Jennings and talked about all the changes he’s seen…

A photo of Rep. Dorothy Pelanda (R-Marysville).
OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES / OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

A lawmaker wants the state to crack down on adults who illegally move adopted kids from one place to another. The representative fighting the problem says this is just another form of human trafficking. 

Republican Dorothy Pelanda says she was shocked to find out an adopted child in her central Ohio district was moved from one house to another to another, and across state lines, without any court approval.

This is known as 're-homing' and Pelanda says this has been going undetected.

Ohio, Army Corps Reach Settlement in Dredging Suit

4 hours ago
A photo of a A ship traveling the Cuyahoga River
ELIZABETH MILLER / ideastream

Ohio and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have settled a lawsuit over dredging in the Cuyahoga River. 

The state and the federal agency have fought for years over how to handle sediment scooped from the river. The Army Corps wanted to dump it out into Lake Erie, but the state said that was unsafe.

Under the settlement, the Army Corps will bear the cost of disposing of sediment dredged in 2016 and 2017. That material was placed in confined disposal facilities, not in the lake.

The settlement was filed Wednesday in federal court in Cleveland.

Tim Ryan and Comeback Cities participants
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

More than a dozen Silicon Valley venture capitalists traveled to Youngstown and Akron yesterday, looking for ways to invest in the Midwest. 

The Comeback Cities Tour was organized by Northeast Ohio Congressman Tim Ryan and his California counterpart, Congressman Ro Khanna. Ryan says the goal is to round out the uneven American economy by boosting entrepreneurs who are not based on the East and West Coasts. 

photo of Jackson Memorial Middle School
SOL HARRIS/DAY ARCHITECTURE

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Feb. 22:

photo of Matt Hectorne
DAVE KOEN

Singer-songwriter Matt Hectorne was raised in the South but now calls Northeast Ohio home. His latest album, “Work,” explores the challenges of living as a married musician often on the road.

The album’s direct, one-word title refers to Hectorne’s own efforts to build a career and improve himself. Hectorne was born in Memphis and raised in Mississippi, but he grew weary of small-town life and eventually ended up in the Cleveland area.

M.L. SCHULTZE
WKSU / HEISER AND PACHISIA

More than a dozen Silicon Valley venture capitalists are taking a closer look this week at what are often dismissed as rust-belt cities: places like Youngstown, Akron and Detroit. They’re trying to figure out if there’s a match to be made with their money and the region’s strengths. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports on the Akron stop on what’s being called the Comeback Cities tour.

The smell of the city’s rubber history still lingers in the stairwells in the old B.F. Goodrich plant on the south side of Akron’s downtown.

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From NPR

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